"

It was June, 1962 when I heard him speak for the first time, and I became an instant Malcolmite from that first speech on. I was mesmerized by him. Had never heard anybody speak like that in my life. And there were two things he said that stuck with me forever.

One was that we are not up against white individuals, we’re up against a system of white supremacy. That was eye-opening.

And the second thing he did that I had never heard before, was he did-He focused as much attention on the psychological attacks as he did on the physical attacks. He was saying that this society has a constant psychological attack on our minds. And though the physical attacks in 2012 have been significantly reduced-Not eliminated!-but significantly reduced, the psychological attacks are unrelenting, and they go on and on and on, and most of our people are not even aware of the strength of these psychological attacks.

Brother Malcolm spoke consistently about that. And until we recognize that, we are never going to get very far because we refuse to deal with that. The television programs, the movies, the books, the songs-all these things are used constantly to attack our minds and especially the minds of our children.

"

-

Peter Bailey on his first encounter with Malcolm X and on some of Malcolm’s teachings that are still relevant today. He worked with Malcolm X during his Malcolm’s last months.

Source: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cyLhcbHaFAM

(via disciplesofmalcolm)

(via disciplesofmalcolm)

12 hours ago 366 notes
21st
October
18,323 notes
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(via unorthodoxqueen)

16 hours ago 18,323 notes
21st
October
307,239 notes
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strangecousinsusanx:

pale-fire:

Feminist Graffiti from the 1970s [x]

I haven’t seen this in a while. It never gets old.

strangecousinsusanx:

pale-fire:

Feminist Graffiti from the 1970s [x]

I haven’t seen this in a while. It never gets old.

(via makingplansdrawingmaps)

23 hours ago 307,239 notes

"Smile as soon as you wake up. It’ll get you in a good mood for the rest of the day."

- (via psych-facts)

(via bornofthelivingsun)

1 day ago 1,175 notes

vichit:

These are my favorite books the books that I always find myself reading over and over and taking something different every time.

To read

1 day ago 1,535 notes
21st
October
2,474 notes
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modernageviking:

From a close friend of Lee’s:
“Bruce had me up to three miles a day, really at a good pace. We’d run the three miles in twenty-one or twenty-tow minutes. Just under eight minutes a mile [Note: when running on his own in 1968, Lee would get his time down to six-and-a-half minutes per mile].
So this morning he said to me “We’re going to go five.”
I said, “Bruce, I can’t go five. I’m a helluva lot older than you are, and I can’t do five.”
He said, “When we get to three, we’ll shift gears and it’s only two more and you’ll do it.”
I said “Okay, hell, I’ll go for it.”
So we get to three, we go into the fourth mile and I’m okay for three or four minutes, and then I really begin to give out.
I’m tired, my heart’s pounding, I can’t go any more and so I say to him, “Bruce if I run any more,” — and we’re still running — “if I run any more I’m liable to have a heart attack and die.” He said, “Then die.” It made me so mad that I went the full five miles.
Afterward I went to the shower and then I wanted to talk to him about it. I said, you know, “Why did you say that?” He said, “Because you might as well be dead. Seriously, if you always put limits on what you can do, physical or anything else, it’ll spread over into the rest of your life. It’ll spread into your work, into your morality, into your entire being. There are no limits. There are plateaus, but you must not stay there, you must go beyond them. If it kills you, it kills you. A man must constantly exceed his level.”

modernageviking:

From a close friend of Lee’s:

“Bruce had me up to three miles a day, really at a good pace. We’d run the three miles in twenty-one or twenty-tow minutes. Just under eight minutes a mile [Note: when running on his own in 1968, Lee would get his time down to six-and-a-half minutes per mile].

So this morning he said to me “We’re going to go five.”

I said, “Bruce, I can’t go five. I’m a helluva lot older than you are, and I can’t do five.”

He said, “When we get to three, we’ll shift gears and it’s only two more and you’ll do it.”

I said “Okay, hell, I’ll go for it.”

So we get to three, we go into the fourth mile and I’m okay for three or four minutes, and then I really begin to give out.

I’m tired, my heart’s pounding, I can’t go any more and so I say to him, “Bruce if I run any more,” — and we’re still running — “if I run any more I’m liable to have a heart attack and die.” He said, “Then die.” It made me so mad that I went the full five miles.

Afterward I went to the shower and then I wanted to talk to him about it. I said, you know, “Why did you say that?” He said, “Because you might as well be dead. Seriously, if you always put limits on what you can do, physical or anything else, it’ll spread over into the rest of your life. It’ll spread into your work, into your morality, into your entire being. There are no limits. There are plateaus, but you must not stay there, you must go beyond them. If it kills you, it kills you. A man must constantly exceed his level.”

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1 day ago 2,474 notes

thechanelmuse:

"Create Your Own Success" by Lauren Roberts from FJorde magazine, Issue 22 (2014).

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1 day ago 3,858 notes
these anons are like, "can i be racist in the rain? can i be racist on a train? can i be racist in a box? can i be racist with a fox?"
Anonymous

whiteoppression:

famphic:

anthotny:

postracialcomments:

lmfaoooooooooooooo Yes!

Lmao!
How can I be racist if I work with blacks
How can I be racist if one sold me slacks
I’m not racist I’m just like you. I’m best friends with a black or two.

i’m not racist, you see, it’s just a preference
i love eastern culture and its women’s deference
the west lost its way with no room for clemency
If I love Asian women, how’s that white supremacy?

i’m not a racist, i can’t be, you see
my great grandma’s grandma was part cherokee
plus one time i got called “cracker” to my face
don’t we all bleed red? i don’t even see race…

the-goddamazon:

LMFAO HE TRIED IT

2 days ago 98,000 notes
20th
October
12,164 notes
Reblog
cakeandrevolution:

sadboosexual:

theyuniversity:

It’s good to know that we weren’t the only ones driven crazy by people who “axe” questions.

Okay, see, we talked about this linguisitic phenomenon in my grammar class. I don’t remember what it’s called, but it happens with other words, too - my professor used an example of “uncomfortable.” When you say it out loud, most likely, it sounds more like “un-comf-ter-ble,” thus mixing up the position of the r and the t, like how the k and the s are mixed in this speech pattern. However, not many people are out here acting high and mighty because someone said “uncomfterble” like they are with “ax,” and that has absolutely everything to do with academic biases - because “ax” is associated mostly with Black people (and occasionally lower-class whites), it’s viewed as “improper” speech, whereas most people, even middle & upper class white people who are thought to speak the most ~proper~ version of English, say “uncomfterble.”
And a quick Google search yields that even Chaucer used “axe” to mean “ask” within his writing. (Source) (Source)
tl;dr actually caring about whether someone says “ask” ~”correctly”~~ is rooted in racist & classist biases of language so, consider, not. 

Most linguistic pedantry is inherently racist in nature.

cakeandrevolution:

sadboosexual:

theyuniversity:

It’s good to know that we weren’t the only ones driven crazy by people who “axe” questions.

Okay, see, we talked about this linguisitic phenomenon in my grammar class. I don’t remember what it’s called, but it happens with other words, too - my professor used an example of “uncomfortable.” When you say it out loud, most likely, it sounds more like “un-comf-ter-ble,” thus mixing up the position of the r and the t, like how the k and the s are mixed in this speech pattern. However, not many people are out here acting high and mighty because someone said “uncomfterble” like they are with “ax,” and that has absolutely everything to do with academic biases - because “ax” is associated mostly with Black people (and occasionally lower-class whites), it’s viewed as “improper” speech, whereas most people, even middle & upper class white people who are thought to speak the most ~proper~ version of English, say “uncomfterble.”

And a quick Google search yields that even Chaucer used “axe” to mean “ask” within his writing. (Source) (Source)

tl;dr actually caring about whether someone says “ask” ~”correctly”~~ is rooted in racist & classist biases of language so, consider, not. 

Most linguistic pedantry is inherently racist in nature.

(via whitepeoplesaidwhat)

2 days ago 12,164 notes

asvpfrenchie:

real shit

(via kngshxt)

2 days ago 23,954 notes